Posted in God

The Man Who Was Cursed

But I, the LORD, search all hearts and examine secret motives. I give all people their due rewards, according to what their actions deserve.” (‭Jeremiah‬ ‭17‬:‭10‬ NLT)

Trust is a virtue every Christian should endeavour to preserve. When this is missing, one is likely to question the disposition of the individual concerned. 

Believers and unbelievers alike have friends. And friendship entails having faith in the other individual. The expectation is that, “this person will constantly be there for me as my buddy,” or “I have confidence in him or her because we have been friends for years (or since childhood).

Still, when friends betrayed the Christians and cast doubt on the foundation of their amity, they found it difficult to understand how it all happened. At this level, no logical suggestions to amend the brokenness seem worth trying. 

Possibly it might be better if those believers who found themselves in the position as the ‘victims’, strive not to forget that humans will be humans. No one except God knows the intention of the hearts. Understandably, some may succeed in turning away the betrayal by reading ahead their unfaithful friends before the occurrences. Yet, many people do end up getting stabbed in the back. 

Who then can one believe? The response is simple; JEHOVAH. We bear the duty to love and be loved in return. We must demonstrate to unbelievers that  Jesus Christ is the true Son of the Father. Every activity of our daily lives must reflect the image of God. Even thus, when it comes to the issue of trust, God is the only one to have faith in. In Jeremiah 17:5, the Lord cursed that Christian, who put his or trust in a human being. 

Why should we give ourselves unnecessary headaches by putting our trust in man when we knew that the person is just a human being like us?

Many God teach us to trust Him completely with our entire life, in Jesus name,

AMEN

Author:

Princess Ayelotan is a writer/poet, feminist and independent researcher. Her scholarly interest ranges widely, from — Creative Writing related to Gender issues; — Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG), — Rape as a weapon of war, — Violence against disabled women, — Child Sexual Exploitation : e.g. child prostitution and trafficking, — Female economic empowerment — Activism.

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